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‘Summer in the City’ – Image Gallery

Via: Facie Populi

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 Genevieve Naylor‘Cooling off: Dozens of children play in a water-filled 104th street in Harlem during 1939’
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‘Seated in a WPA wheelbarrow beside a gushing fire hydrant on the Lower East Side, four boys cool off in 95degree heat during 1939.’
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See more photos, HERE:
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http://www.faciepopuli.com/tagged/Summer
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Hot town, summer in the city
Back of my neck getting dirty and gritty
Been down, isn’t it a pity
Doesn’t seem to be a shadow in the cityAll around, people looking half dead
Walking on the sidewalk, hotter than a match headBut at night it’s a different world
Go out and find a girl
Come-on come-on and dance all night
Despite the heat it’ll be alrightAnd babe, don’t you know it’s a pity
That the days can’t be like the nights
In the summer, in the city
In the summer, in the city

Cool town, evening in the city
Dressing so fine and looking so pretty
Cool cat, looking for a kitty
Gonna look in every corner of the city
Till I’m wheezing like a bus stop
Running up the stairs, gonna meet you on the rooftop

But at night it’s a different world
Go out and find a girl
Come-on come-on and dance all night
Despite the heat it’ll be alright

And babe, don’t you know it’s a pity
That the days can’t be like the nights
In the summer, in the city
In the summer, in the city

– “Summer in the City” is a song recorded by The Lovin’ Spoonful, written by John Sebastian, Mark Sebastian and Steve Boone.
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YouTube – 1966 – ‘Summer in the City’ – Lovin; Spoonful
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NbQK-w2ARsw
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July 19, 2013 Posted by | U.S. Cities, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Zion National Park

Via: Shorpy.com – ‘Always Something Interesting’

http://vintagraph.com/wpa-posters/travel-tourism-posters/3870861

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circa 1938

WPA Federal Art Project poster for the United States Department of the Interior National Park Service: “Zion National Park, Ranger Naturalist Service.”

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August 28, 2011 Posted by | WPA - posters | , , , , , | Leave a comment

WPA: The National Parks Preserve All Life

Via: Shopy.com – ‘Always Something Interesting’

This is a WPA Federal Art Project poster for the National Park Service showing a deer drinking from a forest stream.

Illustrated by Frank S. Nicholson, c. 1940.

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August 14, 2011 Posted by | WPA - posters | , , , , , , | Leave a comment

WPA – Rural Pennsylvania

Via: Shorpy.com – ‘Always Something Interesting’

This poster was created circa 1936 by the WPA Pennsylvania Art Project. The poster reads, simply, “Rural Pennsylvania,” and was illustrated by Katherine Milhous.

http://vintagraph.com/wpa-posters/travel-tourism-posters/

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July 31, 2011 Posted by | Uncategorized, WPA - posters | , , , | Leave a comment

WPA – See America

Via: Shorpy.com – ‘Always Something Interesting’

From 1939 and Alexander Dux, a Works Progress Administration/Federal Art Project poster promoting tourism.

http://vintagraph.com/wpa-posters/

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July 24, 2011 Posted by | WPA - posters | , , , | 1 Comment

WPA – Travel & Tourism Poster

Via: Shorpy “Always Something Interesting’

This poster was created by the WPA Federal Art Project in New York City to promote New York’s municipal airports, circa 1937.

“City of New York Municipal Airports. No. 1 Floyd Bennett Field. No. 2 North Beach. East River Seaplane bases, Wall  Street and 31st Street. F.H. LaGuardia, Mayor. John McKenzie, Commissioner of Docks.”

http://vintagraph.com/wpa-posters/travel-tourism-posters/

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Works Progress Administration (WPA)

The Works Progress Administration (renamed during 1939 as the Work Projects Administration; WPA) was the largest and most ambitious New Deal agency, employing millions of unskilled workers to carry out public works projects, including the construction of public buildings and roads, and operated large arts, drama, media, and literacy projects.

It fed children and redistributed food, clothing, and housing.

Almost every community in the United States had a park, bridge or school constructed by the agency, which especially benefited rural and Western areas.

The budget at the outset of the WPA in 1935 was $1.4 billion a year. (about 6.7 percent of the 1935 GDP), and in total it spent $13.4 billion.[

At its peak in 1938 it provided paid jobs for three million unemployed men (and some women), as well as youth in a separate division the National Youth Administration.

You can read more about the WPA, here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Works_Progress_Administration

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July 16, 2011 Posted by | U.S. Cities, WPA - posters | , , , | 1 Comment